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20121006
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a microphone? >> i'm michael nelson, i analyze technology for bloomberg government. i've probably been to two dozen cybersecurity meetings in the last two years, and every meeting i hear private public partnership. i hear information sharing from government to industry, industry to government. what i don't hear is very much a discussion about more information with the general public. one of the most useful things that's happened in the last five years, this whole area has been sharing information about security breaches with everybody. because that's what huge pressure on companies to take action to secure the resources and to make sure that credit card still go walking out the door. do we need to take a totally different approach? you mention security through obscurity which is still a model of most of the security agencies in town. is there a chance we can move to like the open source community that says too many eyes any bug is shallow. let's stop open source software the applicant look at and probe ethics. let's tell people what real threats are out there so they can start making choices
respects, the power of technology and communications for this enabling people and local levels to act in ways they cannot at federally and as the act in the region and the state level it becomes then clear of the federal level what needs to be done, so from my standpoint, the beginnings of this process are sufficiently still new that it would be assertive third reason why we would be surprised by wife this relatively inaction of the federal level but at the state level a lot is going on. what lisalyn and dave are doing is informing this and energizing it to make it easier at the state level. >> why >> let me first give the most simple answer to your question him something everyone can do when they leave the room. go to the web site, www.loc.org. there is one box that shows you how to tweet and twitter of the debates and ask them to ask a question about reducing poverty and addressing your early childhood child care. you can do that, all of your friends can do that. it's easy to get enough people to do it. there's also a map that puts child care on the map encouraging to get state elec
and testimony in -- this new technology in place, and we have a major position of leadership, but that's not an excuse. this is an excuse that congress has not provided one in the policy, or, two, the funding. both are many place, and now what we need is moving forward, and, again, making certain that the hardware, the software, the systems, and the equipment, and all of the above, as they -- are they -- as they are developed that they are also deployed in an expeditious fashion. another point i want to make here, too, and i will do everything i can to keep faa out of the development of the technology itself. faa should not be developing this technology or step in the way of its development. this, we've seen time and time again that the private sector does a better job. we've got to keep the private sector in the forefront with somebody making the decisions and meeting the milestones, and, again, the blueprint that's been set out by law so we will hold this hearing, additional hearing, and hold faa's feet to the fire, the safety of the flying public, the future of aviation relies on th
steps to solidify our enduring presence on the creative peninsula we have our technology sharing and defense trade with india another state so important to our rebalanced and we believe to the broad security and prosperity of the 21st century. we believe that given the inherent links between india and the united states in values and political philosophy that the only limit to our cooperation with india should be our independent strategic decisions because any to states can defer. not a bureaucratic obstacles i personally am working daily to remove these obstacles. we are working well beyond purely defense trade with india towards technology sharing and co-production. engagement with our allies and partners is a step to executing our rebalanced as if they help any of us achieve our original security objectives. fifth and last the defense department is turning its formidable innovative power to the asian-pacific region. the counterinsurgency that's of course we've gotten very good doing and which we are going to keep, but as we come out of iraq and afghanistan, defense planners, an
of the stockpile through the use of state-of-the-art technology research while maintaining a moratorium on nuclear testing. the administrator commented on the anniversary the past weekend. he said in april, 2009, president obama shared his vision of a world without nuclear weapons. as we work towards the goal we had the world's leading scientific authority, the fastest computers, and the brightest minds. working to ensure that we would never again have to perform nuclear explosive testing in the united states. the effort that tom describes entails a number of programs and tools that work together to maintain a safe, secure and effective nuclear stockpile in the absence of underground nuclear testing. they include the stockpile stewardship program run by the national nuclear security administration, which maintains the continued safety security and reliability of the nation's nuclear in the absence of the nuclear explosive testing. the key goal of the ssp is the understanding if of a nuclear device perform as well as the agent behavior of the weapons material and components to ensure safe and effec
vulnerabilities into the enterprises we find them unacceptable. from the policy and technology perspective, we do need a mix of market levers. most of the companies in the government, because they are responsible for the essential services and citizens' safety are trying to convert to the kaput control into the system, control back into the system and many of the countries are talking about regulation, a lot of regulation. well, in many ways if we want to have adoption of the policy and we are going to encourage the adoption of a policy and we want to have that behavior change, we need to talk about changes also in providing an incentive and i am going to give you an example. we have a policy in the united states that talks about to we want to have energy diversity and efficiency and limit the emissions put into the environment. and that policy is in complemented by a series of subsidies and or tax relief and or credit, however you want to think about it, to encourage that policy. we, as citizens, get paid or get a tax credit for write-off of driving the fuel efficient and electric car, right? yo
words, it's going to affect the economy. i think whoever figures out social media and technology, new ways of communicating with voters, linking policy because i think the way we have all communicated with each other and election neared, tv ads, cable, you know, with all due respect this week, when you were there, i wish you'd come back, i think it is a thing of the past. so whoever is able in these three voting blocs, whoever is able to figure out either party, democrats, republicans, third-party, how to link information flow, education and issues, expanding voter turnout is still a problem it will have only 57% of the eligible voters voting is going to control the american body of politics. and i see that as a healthy thing. so i have posed a problem without an answer, but at least i will say i think i am optimistic that this new technology is going to bring more information in those three groups that i think are the ones that will determine where this country goes. >> governor schwarzenegger commend this is your institute, so you have the last word. >> i think one of the things we
years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard," which he cofounded in 1995. prior to starting that he led the project for the republican future. he also served as chief of staff to vice president quayle and secretary of education bill bennett. he also served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. i'm sure all of you see built regularly on "fox news sunday" and the fox news channel. i actually met bill in 1981 when he was a very young, assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. it's been great to see all the things he has accomplished since that time. so the questions i'd like to pose for each of you come and i'll start with governor huntsman, what does the 2012 election reveal about the respected leadership styles of obama and romney? >> probably not much at this point. >> well, this panel is over. [laughter] >>
and outside. all of us have thoughts and suggestions to offer and some have technological expertise to land or policy expertise as well but it doesn't have to be done internally and it's terrifying when the government says we are here to help you. we are from the transparency community. we are here to help house well. with that i would like to thank all of the panelists. i would like to thank representative fisa and -- issa and quigly. please visit transparentycaucess for the next event and thank you all so much. [applause] i want to raise an issue that has been for two or three weeks specifically on the national security terms. you already are the oldest president in history and some of your staff say you were tired after your most recent encounter with mr. mondale. i recall president kennedy had to go days on end with bear minimum sleep during the cuban missile crisis. is there any doubt in your mind you would be able to function in such circumstances? >> not at all. i want you to know also that i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purpose
is the best role as a producer of renewable energy and its technology? and to what extent should the federal government subsidize these endeavors? heller: first of all, thank you for the question, first of all i think the federal government should be involved and that's why i supported some of the tax funds and the ability for them to put the tax credits what they needed to move forward. i believe we ought to be concentrating here in america. the difference between myself and my put them she thinks about it come from the middle east. the first time i've of her actions they that she is now supporting the pipeline. nevada has an opportunity to that that has a real opportunity for renewable energy. geothermal in the north, we have the most geothermal plant and opportunity and potential in northern nevada than anywhere else in the country. the same with solar, in las vegas. some of the most intense solar when we have in the country. we ought to be taking advantage of the. i voted against my party for the renewable standard because i think it's critically important that you have rules set so we c
time learning how to kind of address this emerging technology. issues such as the adverse reporting when a patient says that a medicine harm to them is that the portable to the pharmaceutical industry looking at this? the patient confidentiality and also issues about how do we deal with misleading information posted by different types of users whether it be a consumer or whether it be potentially another illicit actor. what we are going to be talking about today of course is how the illicit online pharmacies use this format. what led us to this is we were looking at big pharma pharmaceutical companies to see what their presence was and how they were using it. academics or academia can be behind the curve, so when we report the results not surprisingly we found a lot of the pharmaceutical companies using social media. no big surprise to anyone but we just reported this last year. what we found that was very interesting is that we also found illicit links to no prescription online pharmacies while we were doing our searches and what we found was a high prevalence about 90% of the top
budget cuts are made. but we can't afford to do that. we can't afford to lose our technological edge, particularly as we look to the asia-pacific region, so we're protecting those investments. investing in things like cyber, space and electronic warfare, unmanned aerial vehicles, the long-range strike family of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub f
wonderful technologies that propelled us and meet people's lives more comfortable than they would have been had those technologies not entered their lives. >> host: question for you, louis. given what you say is the benefit of the government, right now is the government about the right size and what is its influence on your life? >> caller: i.t. we have to be careful when we throw the word size of the government because they're seems to be a misunderstanding as to what the size of the government is as well as the size of the government. but the reality is the problems dictate the size of the government and we shrink the government by reducing the number of federal employees and we actually then end up contacting people to do those tasks any way and we tend not to count them as the part of the government that they are a part of the government. we are just paying more for that resource now and people need to kind of recognize that when we take our resources it is a finite amount. it truly is coming and we take that finite amount of resources and we decide we are not going to pay the federal e
how to inflate your turnout among your base using technology and microtargeting and datamining and all of that. i think the obama campaign has done extremely, extremely well at that. i think you know for if you are going to look at a model, that is one to look at in terms of the strategy employed in this campaign or at least on the romney obama, on the obama side. >> if i could add one quick thing. i kind of doubt that carl is going everyday to check his mailbox for that check. [laughter] >> yeah, you think that is pretty safe. >> we have got one in the middle. back over that way to that side. >> will martindale at aarp. i was just wondering as mr. bolger said both candidates showed that they are qualified to be president last night but i was wondering if you thought that the demeanor really was the main factor last night as opposed to the actual message that they were saying and the actual their own facts in their own statistics and i was wondering if you thought that it was really all about the way they came out and energy they had or if what they were saying had as big an effect as
is that technology has totally changed our expectations as you said about everything else. that conversation is going to happen no matter what. people are going to talk about everything constantly and that can be the substance of what is happening in congress, or if it isn't, something else is going to take its place and we aren't going to like what that is going to be. it's going to be ridiculous out of control partisan. so to me is a question of the starting point should be dialogue is going to be happening and we want that to be informed with at least what is happening but it is a very minimum. >> if i could point out one little thing and trust me my own members are just as guilty of this there was and never is a 72 hour [rollcall] spruill has been since it was put in place and probably the early 1970's the third beef the third day, so if it says a committee report, and that is what it actually refers to has been available it can be called up on the third day after which it's been available it's keyed off of when the government office physically delivered offset printed copies to the house. things
literacy, building an economy focused around art, innovation and technology, and supporting local and community policing initiatives. as the students we are glad to have here as well, rachel stanley is a junior at elon college majoring in international studies with all sorts of minors, political science, and she has worked with refugees and her region. she is the president of halal on her campus and the millennial values fellow so we are pleased that she is back. last but not least, mohammad usman is a senior at depauw university majoring in urban policy and conflict studies with a minor in religious studies. he was a part of the national bioethics bowl, the winning team in the last year so congratulations on that. and before attending depauw was a special assistant in advocate for acts of civil legal justice at the university of new york school of law. so welcome to all of them. i would like to hear from all of you, and last night when we heard governor romney talk about states as the laboratory of democracy so while that may have been a republican democrat comment it got me thin
rights of all states to acquire nuclear technology for peaceful purposes. mr. president, the insistence of the united states and countries of the european union and others to impose unilateral economic measures violate, violates the regulations of international law on the principles of free trade, and raises questions about the legality and morality of such practices. based on this, we call for lifting the embargo imposed on cuba by the united states for decades. we also renew our call for lifting and stopping all unilateral coercive measures imposed on the peoples of other countries, such as venezuela, belarus, iran, syria and the democratic people's republic of korea. mr. president, our aspiration to achieve a positive reform of the international organization stems from our desire to find a world based on justice, security and prosperity for all the peoples of the world, away from the colonial tendencies -- hegemonic tendencies of some countries that seek to exploit the united nations to achieve their own interests at the expense of other countries. we hope that the united nations can
that i would call mexican technology. the recent election in mexico, everybody voted. nobody asked you whether you were allowed to vote, registered to vote. the only way to vote was to have the registration card from the national voter registration office. that was given to everybody across the country. that isn't your driver's license. you're driver's license comes from each state like it does in the u.s., but the voter registration card comes from the federal mexican government, and it is a different series of proof you need to prove that you are a mexican citizen and that's it. they don't care how we were going to vote or where you are going to vote from. you get a card, it has your photograph and also has your fingerprints so there are no faking at the same time. it is a rather high-tech card, but it's a given out by the federal electoral commission so this is something we should think that for the future. >> again what a lot of people don't understand is that there is no federal standard. although you might have a presidential election in the congressional races they are still gov
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18